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LESSON: Rocky shores, sandy beaches and river mouths

Description

We participate in many different activities around the coast lines of our homes. Within these environments lie many dangers that we need to understand. Knowledge handed down from our tūpuna and knowledge developed by organisations of today can ensure of safety when in these various environments. The aim of this unit is to learn about and understand the many dangers of these environments as well as understanding and practicing the safety knowledge associated with each area.

 

Achievement Objectives

Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Te Reo Māori (3/4)

Language Functions

  • The student is able to express themselves to develop understanding.

  • The student is developing skills in the different genres of writing that they are familiar with.

Vocabulary

Are able to select and use new vocab in various contexts.

Language strategies

Are able to use various research strategies.

Health (3)

Connections to environment Students can express thoughts about connections between people and place.

Social Studies (3)

Place and Environment

Students can show how people are connected to special places.

Te Aho Matua

Te Ira Tangata
  • The student values his or her identity, is self confdent and displays positive self-esteem.

  • The student is physically, spiritually and emotionally confdent.

Ngā Iwi
  • The student exhibits personal pride in their whānau, iwi and hapū.

  • The student acknowledges the importance attached to the different roles and responsibilities.

Te Ao
  • The student acknowledges his or her place in the Māori world, the wider world.

Wai Puna

Whakapapa
  • Traditional stories of iwi areas.

  • Tangaroa and the many kaitiaki of the coastal environments.

  • The on-going battle between Tangaroa and Tāwhirimātea and how this can create dangers.

Mātauranga
  • To understand the many dangers of different coastal environments and how to minimise the dangers to us.

Tikanga
  • To learn practices to use before, during and after coastal activities to ensure our safety.

 

 

Learning Intentions

Students learn about:

  • The dangers that are present in the various coastal environments (i.e. rocky shore, sandy beach and river mouth).

  • Strategies they can use to understand and minimize these dangers.

Success Criteria

Students are able to:

  • Identify dangers in each coastal environment.

  • Discuss their understanding about how to minimise these dangers when going into the different environments.

  • Practice and use some of these strategies to ensure they can safely conduct activities or mahi in these

    environments.

Resources

Atlases and maps from the school library.

Atlases and maps - from school library

Blank map of Aotearoa

Blank map of local environment

Places and place names website link

 

Lessons

For each environment we will look at the following aspects

  • The dangers present in that environment
  • The strategies we can use before, during and after activities in that environment to keep ourselves safe.

Inquiry questions

  • What dangers are present in the environment?
  • How do we keep ourselves safe before, during and after activities in that environment?

 

Wānanga 1

Sandy Beaches

Whole class discussion about the activities that they already do in this environment.
  • What do they do in this environment?
  • What are the dangers that they know of?
  • What have their whānau taught them about the dangers of this environment?
  • Have they experienced these dangers?
  • If they had experienced these dangers, what did they do?
  • What are some of the strategies that they used to keep safe?
  • What have they heard in the news, on the web, in the newspapers about accidents in this place?
Activities at the sandy beach could include:
  • Swimming
  • Surfing/boogie-boarding/skim-boarding
  • Collecting tuatua, pipi, hūwai, scallops, toheroa
  • Drag netting in the surf
  • Surfcasting
  • Playing touch on shore
  • Beach launching or retrieving a boat
  • Paddling a waka ama.
Dangers they need to learn about
  • Rips
  • Waves
  • Wind (Hypothermia)
  • Holes
  • Sand banks.
Strategies
  • Karakia
  • Knowing how to read weather and wind maps
  • Knowing how to identify rips and what to do if caught in one
  • Knowing how to read sets of waves and where waves are breaking
  • Knowing about the types of waves
  • Swimming between the flags
  • Practicing tikanga such as not turning your back to the sea, not yelling and screaming close to the water, not eating kaimoana in the water, not taking too much, not taking from areas that are in rāhui.
Group strategy

Children will be broken into groups where they will be given or can choose a danger or a strategy. These lessons are self-directed learning where the aim is for the tamariki to learn about their strategy or danger and create a presentation or resources to teach their teina (younger students in the school).

 

 

Wānanga 4-6

Rocky Shores

Whole class discussion about the activities that they do in this environment
  • What do they do in this environment?
  • What are the dangers that they know of?
  • What have their whānau taught them about the dangers of this environment?
  • Have they experienced these dangers?
  • If they had experienced these dangers, what did they do?
  • What are some of the strategies that they used to keep safe?
Activities at the rocky shore could include:
  • Swimming/bombing
  • Surfing/boggy boarding
  • Collecting oysters, kina, pāua, mussels
  • Diving
  • Fishing off the rocks
Dangers they need to learn about (Mātauranga)
  • Rips
  • Waves
  • Tides
  • Wind (Hypothermia)
  • Walking across the rocks
  • Rocks
  • Dragged or dumped on rocks
  • Slipping off rocks
  • Taking too much kaimoana
Strategies (Mātauranga and Tikanga)
  • Karakia
  • Knowing how to read weather and wind maps
  • Knowing how to identify rips and what to do if caught in one
  • Knowing about wave action and set waves
  • Never diving alone
  • Knowing when the tides are (rock fshing)
Group strategy

Children will be broken into groups where they will be given or can choose a danger or a strategy. These lessons are self-directed learning where the aim is for the tamariki to learn about their strategy or danger and create a presentation or resources to teach their teina (younger students in the school).

Rocky Beach visit

Visit rocky beach to collect kaimoana and practice safe tikanga around the beaches.

 

Wānanga 9-10

 

River mouth/ Harbour entrance

Whole class discussion about the activities that they do in this environment
  • What do they do in this environment?
  • What are the dangers that they know of?
  • What have their whānau taught them about the dangers of this environment?
  • Have they experienced these dangers?
  • If they had experienced these dangers, what did they do?
  • What are some of the strategies that they used to keep safe?
Activities at the river mouth could include:
  • Swimming
  • Surfing
  • Fishing off the river bank/whitebaiting
  • Netting
  • Paddling a waka ama
  • Boating
  • Surfing/skiing/wakeboarding
Dangers they need to learn about (Mātauranga)
  • Rips
  • Waves
  • Tides
  • Wind (Hypothermia)
  • Walking across the rocks
  • Rainfall increasing river flow
  • Debris
  • Currents and eddies created by the river meeting the sea
Strategies (Mātauranga and Tikanga)
  • Karakia
  • Knowing how to read weather and wind maps
  • Knowing how to identify rips and what to do if caught in one
  • Knowing about wave action and set waves
  • Knowing about river flow
Group strategy

Children will be broken into groups where they will be given or can choose a danger or a strategy. These lessons are self-directed learning where the aim is for the tamariki to learn about their strategy or danger and create a presentation or resources to teach their teina (younger students in the school).

River mouth/Harbour entrance visit
Visit river mouth or harbour entrance.

River mouth/Harbour entrance visit:

Visit river mouth or harbour entrance.

 

Assessment

  • Survival swimming lessons
  • Class discussions
  • Activities in the different environments
  • The activities that have been prepared for the younger students
  • The teachings and support given to the younger students
 
 


Hauora

These resources can be organised across the four strands of learning:

Waiora – personal health and development

Piki mai, kake mai. Homai te waiora ki ahau.

Come to me, join with me. Bring me the waters of life.

Students will explore and learn about food and nutrition that sustain the physical body, and explore the notion of sustenance that contributes to the wellbeing of mind and spirit. Students will also describe, consider and analyse aspects of personal growth and development, safety and safe practices.

Koiri - Movement concepts and motor skills

Ko te piko o te māhuri, tērā te tupu o te rākau. As the sapling is bent, so the tree will grow.

Students will develop and apply movement concepts and motor skills and have opportunities to participate in and enjoy physical activities.

Taiao - Health and the environment

Hāhā te whenua, hāhā te tangata. Desolate land, desolate people.

Students will discuss and exchange ideas about the close and enduring relationship between people and the natural environment, exploring ways to lessen harmful environmental impacts.

Tangata - People and relationships

He taura taonga e motu, he taura tangata e kore e motu.

A string of beads is easily broken, but human bonds can never be severed.

Students will describe and analyse human relationships in a variety of contexts, both personal and those of others. There are four encompassing aspects of Hauora, interwoven within all the strands.

Te wairua

Involves Māori perspectives on the fundamental nature of humanity including customs, practices and protocols, Te Reo Māori, values and attitudes.

The purpose of including these aspects is to provide guidance in teaching and learning hauora in safe and positive ways, and to affrm and support unique Māori views of the world.

 

 

 

 

 

Wai Puna Model

Wai Puna is central to the development of the water safety Unit Plan available for kaiako in Kura Kauapapa Māori and mainstream kura, primarily for Years 1 - 8. 

 

 

 
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